Sunday, December 23, 2007

CORRECTIONS & EXPLANATIONS - December 23, 2007.

Below are the corrections and explanations for last week’s postings.

Monday

Correct the errors and give reasons for your choices.

All are incomplete thoughts. None can stand as a principal clause.

“The man who took on the union at the wheel.
Remove “who” and there is a complete thought.
“The man took on the union at the wheel.

The man who took on the owners riding shotgun.”
Remove “who” and there is a complete thought.
The man took on the owners riding shotgun.”

“Both on and off the ice.”
A subject and a verb must be inserted.
“They competed fiercely both on and off the ice.”

“The only way both men believe it should be played – with the utmost of passion and while skating along a thin line between the laws of the game and the laws of the street.”
Reword the sentence by inserting a subject and a verb to create a principal clause.
“Both men played the game the only way they knew how – with the utmost of passion and while skating along a thin line between the laws of the game and the laws of the street.”


Tuesday

PRESUME/ASSUME

Presume” means to suppose or take for granted beforehand without prior knowledge or without direct truth. One is “presumed” innocent by the law without proof of guilt.

Assume” means to take up or on oneself or to take for granted. The noun form is “assumption”. A person can assume office either rightfully or wrongfully. So too, he can arrogantly assume he is always right.


Wednesday

Determine the errors in the sentence below.

"And anything they do for the rest of their life is somehow referenced in that instant as they make their way up the ice, carrying the puck, and the respect of everybody in that town."
“They” do not have one “life”. “They” are individuals who have “lives”.
I, also, suggest there should not be a comma after the word “puck”. Some will argue the point, but I prefer the traditional way.

"And anything they do for the rest of their lives is somehow referenced in that instant as they make their way up the ice, carrying the puck, and the respect of everybody in that town."


Thursday

Below are a few examples of poor, sloppy or incorrect diction and incomplete sentence construction. Can you identify and correct the errors?

"Lawson loaned the track $1 million and the other two each put in $500,000."
“Loan” is a noun, not a verb. The past tense of “lend” is “lent” and must be used.
"Lawson lent the track $1 million and the other two each put in $500,000."

"Those of you that live in the county, do you have [anything to add]?"
“Who” must be used when referring to people. “That” refers to a “thing”.
"Those of you who live in the county, do you have [anything to add]?"

"Traffic time brought to you by [PRODUCT]."
This is not a sentence nor is it a headline. A verb must be added.
"Traffic time is brought to you by [PRODUCT]."

"Drew Dilkens is anxious to hear what they have to say."
“Anxious” comes from “anxiety”. “Anxiety” is not what was intended by the context and is the wrong word.
"Drew Dilkens is eager to hear what they have to say."


Friday

AGGRAVATE/IRRITATE

Aggravate” means to make worse.

Irritate” means to exasperate or inflame.



THE WEEK’S WORDS

Melange" (n.) means a hodgepodge, odds and ends or a motley assortment of things

Aphorism" (n.) is a short instructive saying, a pithy statement of a truth.

Moue" (n.) is a pout, a grimace or a wry facial expression.

Slovenly" (adj.) means slatternly, sluttish, shaggy, slipshod or untidy.

Rhapsodic" (adj.) means elated, ecstatic, gleeful or joyful.


A GOOD THOUGHT

"The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance."
Socrates

1 comment:

ken said...

Windsor Star Dec 21st
Letters to the Editor - page A9

Headline:
Graphic adds highlight safety on the job.

=====================================
Windsor Star Dec 22nd
Business section - page A20

The article and photo should be referring to the former van plant SITE as the plant itself is long gone.

regards,

Ken